Saturday, February 14, 2015

A Package in a league of its own: Helm

A Package in a league of its own: <code>Helm</code>:

emacs-helm/helm · GitHub

emacs-helm/helm · GitHub: "Helm is now available on Melpa at http://melpa.org/ You will find there instructions to install. See also https://github.com/milkypostman/melpa#usage to startup correctly with the emacs packaging system. Then you should need only in your init file:

(require 'helm-config)

milkypostman/melpa · GitHub

milkypostman/melpa · GitHub

(require 'package)
(add-to-list 'package-archives
             '("melpa" . "http://melpa.org/packages/") t)
(when (< emacs-major-version 24)
  ;; For important compatibility libraries like cl-lib
  (add-to-list 'package-archives '("gnu" . "http://elpa.gnu.org/packages/")))
(package-initialize)

Friday, March 22, 2013

Built-in table editor - The Org Manual

Built-in table editor - The Org Manual: "C-c ^     (org-table-sort-lines)
Sort the table lines in the region. The position of point indicates the column to be used for sorting, and the range of lines is the range between the nearest horizontal separator lines, or the entire table. If point is before the first column, you will be prompted for the sorting column. If there is an active region, the mark specifies the first line and the sorting column, while point should be in the last line to be included into the sorting. The command prompts for the sorting type (alphabetically, numerically, or by time). When called with a prefix argument, alphabetic sorting will be case-sensitive.
"

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

GNU Emacs Calc Manual

GNU Emacs Calc Manual: "To make a long story short, Emacs Lisp turned out to be a distressingly solid implementation of Lisp, and the humble task of calculating turned out to be more open-ended than one might have expected."

'via Blog this'

Thursday, January 31, 2013

Queen

Queen: "A platform for running scripts on many browsers
Let's say you want to play a game where you write down a number and others try to guess it. You gather some friends and tell them to start giving numbers at you. Your friends keep giving you random numbers until one of them gets it right.

Now imagine your friends are browsers, and the game is a script which tells browsers how to play, and waits for the right number to be guessed. This makes you the Queen Server. The Queen Servers allows you to perform distributed tasks on many browsers -- a platform for running scripts on many browsers.

Let's run the example:"

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